Category Archives: Ethics

The Disease of denial

“For decades now, Republican politicians and their patrons in the fossil fuel industry have used thinktanks, front groups and public relations operatives to promote faulty science and perpetuate the myth that the climate crisis is a hoax. This campaign of climate deception, which is elegantly documented in books like Merchants of Doubt, has exacted a huge toll on the planet and its people – it has sabotaged domestic and international efforts to combat greenhouse gas pollution and exacerbated a crisis that is acidifying oceans, melting polar ice caps, supercharging storms and making the Earth less hospitable to human and animal life. We have a name for the purveyors of this deceitful campaign: we call them “climate deniers”.”

“Now, it appears, prominent Republican officials and their industry benefactors are using the same bankrupt strategy to sow doubt about the wildlife extinction crisis that threatens the continued existence of as many as one million species across the globe. The Republican elites are not just climate deniers – they are extinction deniers too.”

Medicynical note: Ultimately it’s all about short term monetary gain. Everything.

Deaths in U.S. Concentration Camps– it’s really happening.

No children had died in federal immigration custody for a decade—until the Trump administration.

Medicynical note: What else would you call them…….without using a euphemism?

Trump and Putin pledge to work together in the future

Co-conspirators have a laugh together. A real president would have publicly renounced the Russian attack on our elections and taken steps to prevent this from recurring.

Medicynical note: Trump of course has to tred carefully if he wants Putin’s future support and a hotel deal in Moscow. Business comes first with this president. National security and integrity are really not his primary concerns.

Great Moments in American Medicine: Snake Bite $142,000

Overcharging is the rule in the U.S.

The average list price for CroFab is $3,198 per vial, according to the health care information tech company Connecture. Manufacturing costs, product improvements and research all factor into the drug’s price, said Chris Sampson, spokesman for BTG. ”

“A Mexican version of snake antivenin can cost roughly $200. But it couldn’t be sold in the U.S. (More about that in a moment.)”

And

“In Oakley’s case, St. Vincent Evansville hospital charged $16,989.25 for each unit of CroFab, according to the facility’s bill. That’s more than five times higher than the average list price.”

“WellRithms analyzed Oakley’s bill from St. Vincent Evansville at Kaiser Health News’ request and found providers generally accept $16,159.70 for all four vials of the drug.”

Read the article for more.

Medicynical note: The U.S. overcharging for healthcare services seems to be more the rule rather than the exception, particularly for those in life threatening situations. If the patient is insured they will most often get a significant discount rate that cuts the bill dramatically. Ironically if a person has no insurance, hospitals and other providers bill the full amount…… to the most vulnerable patients

American Justice? Assange vs Mohammed bin Salman

Assange taken from Embassy.

Medicynical note: Interesting contrast. For Assange, an extradition request from the US for the crime of publishing secret material which was probably illegally obtained came immediately after removal from Ecuadorian embassy.

Meanwhile, bin Salman who ordered the assassination of a US resident journalist working for the Washington Post and openly tortures his own citizens for seeking their basic rights is viewed as a friend by Trump and Pence.

I don’t doubt that Assange deserves careful scrutiny for several issues. But I’m absolutely certain that overlooking bin Salman’s murderous actions is a crime

Fiat-Chrysler Games the System

Rather than build fuel efficient cars FiatChrysler decides to cheat.

“Environmental regulations can create strange bedfellows, it seems. The Financial Times has learned that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles will pay Tesla hundreds of millions of euros (specific numbers aren’t available) to pool the EV brand’s cars with its own fleet and avoid fines for violating stricter EU emissions rules in 2020. The move should help FCA meet the EU’s CO2 emissions target of 95g per kilometer by lowering its average from a higher-than-usual 123g. Fiat Chrysler has been relatively slow to adopt electric and hybrid cars — this buys it time to catch up without having to take many (if any) radical steps.”

Medicynical note: Gaming the system. Sad but apparently true, manipulating regulation is one key to success in capitalism. Ask Boeing, or big Pharma (here and here and here).

Meh. So a few people here and there die. As long as revenue grows what’s the big deal.

It is the Corporations

Backed by health insurance corporations, Trump and the GOP have spent years trying to repeal, negate, or undermine the law that’s provided health care to between 20 and 30 million Americans. (They failed in Congress, but they’re still trying in court.)”

“Backed by billionaires, they passed an almost incomprehensibly large tax cut for the rich that’s sent the deficit soaring to record heights — and immediately proposed huge cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security to cover the difference.”

“Egged on by military contractors, they’ve put forth military budgets that award more money to a single corporation — Lockheed Martin — than the federal government spends on K-12 education. (And much of it is for a single plane that doesn’t work.)”

Medicynical note: And they want your civil rights, gay rights, contraception, right to choose, your unions and yes your Social Security too.

United Healthcare…..in it for the money

Not a big surprise

For those who thought insurance companies are in it to provide excellent healthcare……you were wrong.

“US Chief Magistrate Judge Joseph Spero issued his decision Tuesday against United Behavioral Health, a unit of UnitedHealthcare, saying the insurer created internal policies that effectively discriminated against those seeking mental health and substance abuse treatment.”

“”It is well-established that effective treatment of mental health and substance use disorders includes treatment aimed at preventing relapse or deterioration of the patient’s condition and maintaining the patient’s level of functioning. UBH Guidelines deviate from that standard,” Spero said”

Medicynical notes: Given a choice between enhanced profits or funding excellent care, the private insurer’s policy was programmed to choose the former. After all it’s their their fiduciary responsibility.

Pizza and Prescriptions.

We’ve talked about doctors receiving honoraria and other payments from drug companies to influence their choice of treatments.  Always quite righteously physician groups have responded to such allegations with drivel about their professionalism and their over riding concern for their patients.  That works up to a point but in our culture money talks.

This puts such arguments to rest:

As little as one free meal from a drug company can influence which medicines doctors prescribe for Medicare patients, according to a study using Medicare records and recently released data from the health care law’s Open Payments program.

More here.

Medicynical Note:  For the almost 50 years that I’ve been a physician drug companies have vied for face time with physicians.  Some of it is fairly legitimate education on new better drugs but most is simply  a sales pitch to get the doc to change his/her prescribing habits, almost always with limited benefit and  increased cost.  Various incentives are provided to get this access–cash payments, meals, faux jobs, deals on medications given directly to patients.  It all works and it all costs the system integrity and cash. 

But hey that’s the way America works. Check out the gun lobby and the recent assault weapons votes.  Money buys access and influence.  Doctors are not immune. 

Your Money or Your Life: America’s Health Care Disaster

It used to be financial planning was a field which provided assistance for the golden years (retirement),  In the U.S. financial planning is necessary for patients to get their health care.  Our amazingly inefficiency expensive (most in the world) health care non-system is now providing such planning to patients to “help” finance their care.  Something is terribly wrong here.

His doctor had prescribed the cancer drug Gleevec, but Steiner’s insurance refused to cover its $3,500 monthly cost. Steiner, a warehouse manager for a publisher of Bible-themed literature, and his wife, Brenda, a part-time nurse, made just $30,000 a year. No way could they afford the drug on their own.

“We still had six kids at home — how were we going to come up with that kind of money?” Steiner said. “We couldn’t re-mortgage the house, because it had already been re-mortgaged. I wouldn’t have been able to take the medication. We would have had to just trust in the Lord.”

It was a scary brush with “financial toxicity,” as researchers call the mix of economic stress, anxiety and depression cancer patients often endure. But then Steiner was assigned to Dan Sherman, an oncology social worker at Mercy Health Lacks Cancer Center who within days got a free supply of Gleevec from the manufacturer. He also made sure it was delivered promptly. The package arrived at Steiner’s home on Christmas Eve, his 46th birthday.

In the eight years since, Steiner has faced a series of medical and financial reversals, and each time Sherman has done as much as any doctor to keep Steiner going — scrambling to get the treatment he needed without sending his family into bankruptcy. “He keeps throwing me life rafts before I sink,” Steiner said.

Read the entire article.

Medicynical Note:  Health care in the U.S. is a special type of hell if you are not independently wealthy.  Something like 60% of bankruptcies in our country are related to medical expenses and it appears from the above article that the first goal of our non-system is to spend all the patient’s savings and then offer assistance.

Our insurance companies’ main goal is to assure profits to share holders, hospitals have a multilevel billing system which ironically bills most those without insurance coverage and least able to pay;  our drug companies think nothing of gouging patients to pad their bottom line, because they can (pretty sadistic); and our medical practitioners often are on their receiving end of payments from technology providers to get them to use the company’s product.  Care of patient is not the primary concern of many in our health care industry.

There are bright spots.  People working to help patient’s figure out the non-system; primary care types working very hard for relatively (compared to some medical specialties) low salaries; our nursing and medical support colleagues who work face to face with patients helping with their care and problems, medical and otherwise.  

The Affordable Care Act is a good first step but more needs to be done.